Invertebrata

Invertebrate education and photography

July 23, 2014 9:25 pm
rhamphotheca:

Spanish Moth (Xanthopastis timais), family Noctuidae, native to the SE United States, as well as Central and northern South America and the Caribbean, but occasionally found wandering up the East Coast of the U.S.
photo: Richard Crook/Flickr

rhamphotheca:

Spanish Moth (Xanthopastis timais), family Noctuidae, native to the SE United States, as well as Central and northern South America and the Caribbean, but occasionally found wandering up the East Coast of the U.S.

photo: Richard Crook/Flickr

July 22, 2014 10:57 pm

sciencefriday:

This week’s Picture of the Week is the Io moth, the symbol of National Moth Week.

As a caterpillar, it is covered in poisonous spikes. When it’s matured, the moth doesn’t feed at all, surviving solely on energy during its brief life. Learn more here.

10:54 pm

sciencetoastudent:

lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

sciencetoastudent:

As I left my local library today….

In my experience, when pressed ants are more interested in self-preservation than food when it comes down to it.  This is perfectly understandable.  So, like I did so many thousands of times as a boy, I blew on the ants, expecting them to scatter and reveal whatever food source they were on and go running.  Nope.  I also noticed there were no trails of ants going off to or from a nest.

Anyone seen this before?

Weird…

Fire ants by any chance?

Or are they all gone from the US?

Nope, not fire ants, but I’m afraid my myrmecological skills end just about there without hitting a good research library to grab some formicid books for ident purposes.

sr-ricos said: when I’ve seen something similar, they were transporting their larvae to a new location. At least I saw some of them carrying larvae, but I’m no entomologist

I’ve seen that before, too, but they weren’t traveling from one location to another, and I found no objects in any of their mandibles whatsoever.  Interesting.

gryffinthesnake said: THAT IS TERRIFYING WHY WOULD YOU GET THAT CLOSE TO IT

If you get to know them a little bit ants are really fun, charming little creatures.  At least fascinating, if you don’t look at them the same way I do.  I personally am biased and have quite the affinity for them.  They’re old childhood friends of mine, really.  I can’t even begin to calculate how many blissful hours were spent just watching ants.

While it’s difficult to make out many distinguishing characters I think it’s likely that these are Pavement Ants (Tetramorium caespitum). This may be a battle between rival colonies. This is a common behavior for this species.

3:51 pm

astronomy-to-zoology:

Boisduval’s Autumn Moth (Oenosandra boisuvalii)

…a species of Oenosandrid moth which is the sole member of the monotypic genus Oenosandra. Boisduval’s autumn moths are endemic to the southern half of Australia, including Tasmania. Boisduval’s autumn moth caterpillars are commonly associated with and feed on Eucalyptus spp. 

Classification

Animalia-Insecta-Lepidoptera-Noctuoidea-Oenosandridae-Oenosandra-O. boisduvalli

Image(s): Donald Hobern

2:39 pm
amnhnyc:

Our celebration of National Moth Week continues with the Hornet moth! Yesterday we featured the Madagascan sunset moth, and if you’re looking for more moth facts, head over to the Museum blog. 

amnhnyc:

Our celebration of National Moth Week continues with the Hornet moth! Yesterday we featured the Madagascan sunset moth, and if you’re looking for more moth facts, head over to the Museum blog

July 21, 2014 9:19 pm
Green Arches Moth (Anaplectoides prasina)-
The Green Arches Moth occurs regularly in North America and Europe. It’s camouflage allows it to remain hidden on mossy and lichen covered tree bark.
(Image source: Biopix)

Green Arches Moth (Anaplectoides prasina)-

The Green Arches Moth occurs regularly in North America and Europe. It’s camouflage allows it to remain hidden on mossy and lichen covered tree bark.

(Image source: Biopix)

5:03 pm
Bella Moth (Utetheisa ornatrix)-
U. ornatrix, commonly known as the Bella Moth, is a species of day flying moth that is distributed throughout most of North America. They use aposematic coloration to warn potential predators that they are unpalatable.
(Image source: Bob Peterson)

Bella Moth (Utetheisa ornatrix)-

U. ornatrix, commonly known as the Bella Moth, is a species of day flying moth that is distributed throughout most of North America. They use aposematic coloration to warn potential predators that they are unpalatable.

(Image source: Bob Peterson)

4:49 pm
amnhnyc:

Happy National Moth Week!
We’re celebrating all week with marvelous moth species. First up, the Madagascan Sunset moth. Head over to the Museum’s blog to learn more.

amnhnyc:

Happy National Moth Week!

We’re celebrating all week with marvelous moth species. First up, the Madagascan Sunset moth. Head over to the Museum’s blog to learn more.

July 20, 2014 10:32 pm

astronomy-to-zoology:

Epicopeia hainesii

…is a species of Oriental Swallowtail Moth (Epicopeiidae) which is distributed throughout the Korean Peninsula, Japan, and Taiwan. Like other members of its family E. hainesii looks very similar to the swallowtail butterflies of the family Papilionidae, and possibly mimics them. 

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Lepidoptera-Epicopeiidae-Epicopeia-E. hainesii

Images: 三上 勝生 and うり