Invertebrata

Invertebrate education and photography

September 30, 2014 3:16 pm

nycbugman:

Megacyllene robinia- Locust Borer

First time getting pictures of one of these, another fave!

(via somuchscience)

September 29, 2014 9:00 pm
libutron:

Kaiser’s Nudibranch - Polycera kaiserae
Described in 2007 from Bahia de Banderas in the Pacific Coast of Mexico, Polycera kaiserae (Nudibranchia - Polyceridae) is a beautiful nudibranch often found swimming in underwater caves. Although nudibranchs in general are known for their striking jewel-like colors, this species is particularly distinctive for its white polka dots on a pink body with navy blue tips. 
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Alicia Hermosillo | Locality: Bahía de Banderas, Nayarit/Jalisco, Mexico (2009)

libutron:

Kaiser’s Nudibranch - Polycera kaiserae

Described in 2007 from Bahia de Banderas in the Pacific Coast of Mexico, Polycera kaiserae (Nudibranchia - Polyceridae) is a beautiful nudibranch often found swimming in underwater caves. Although nudibranchs in general are known for their striking jewel-like colors, this species is particularly distinctive for its white polka dots on a pink body with navy blue tips. 

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Alicia Hermosillo | Locality: Bahía de Banderas, Nayarit/Jalisco, Mexico (2009)

(via rhamphotheca)

September 23, 2014 9:21 pm
astronomy-to-zoology:

Emarginate Dog Winkle (Nucella emarginata)
…a species of rock snail (Muricidae) which is distributed between the Bering Sea and the Pacific coast of Mexico. Emarginate dog winkles are a fairly small species with individual shell sizes ranging from 25-30 mm (1 in). Like other members of the Muricidae N. emarginata is carnivorous, feeding on a range of hard bodied slow-moving invertebrates. 
Classification
Animalia-Mollusca-Gastropoda-Caenogastropoda-Hypsogastropoda-Neogastropoda-Muricoidea-Muricidae-Ocenebrinae-Nucella-N. emarginata
Image: marlin harms

astronomy-to-zoology:

Emarginate Dog Winkle (Nucella emarginata)

…a species of rock snail (Muricidae) which is distributed between the Bering Sea and the Pacific coast of Mexico. Emarginate dog winkles are a fairly small species with individual shell sizes ranging from 25-30 mm (1 in). Like other members of the Muricidae N. emarginata is carnivorous, feeding on a range of hard bodied slow-moving invertebrates. 

Classification

Animalia-Mollusca-Gastropoda-Caenogastropoda-Hypsogastropoda-Neogastropoda-Muricoidea-Muricidae-Ocenebrinae-Nucella-N. emarginata

Image: marlin harms

September 19, 2014 10:44 am
brains-and-bodies:

From Natural Selection







"While these organised structures might look like the work of an artist, they’re actually just the remnants left behind where a sand bubbler crab’s been snacking. During low tide they exit their burrows (as seen in the top pic) to scour the sand for tiny bits of organic debris in a radial motion. While eating, the crabs ball the excess sand on their heads, then discard it when it gets too big for them to see over, leaving behind a remarkable-looking reminder which helps them keep from searching for food in the same sand twice.Each time High Tide returns, the small structures crumble and are washed away, all while leaving behind more food particles to fuel the tiny crab’s next accidentally artistic pursuits.”Source: http://tinyurl.com/7vpzwj8Video of the Sand bubbler crab in action:http://vimeo.com/6449515

brains-and-bodies:

From Natural Selection

"While these organised structures might look like the work of an artist, they’re actually just the remnants left behind where a sand bubbler crab’s been snacking. 

During low tide they exit their burrows (as seen in the top pic) to scour the sand for tiny bits of organic debris in a radial motion. While eating, the crabs ball the excess sand on their heads, then discard it when it gets too big for them to see over, leaving behind a remarkable-looking reminder which helps them keep from searching for food in the same sand twice.

Each time High Tide returns, the small structures crumble and are washed away, all while leaving behind more food particles to fuel the tiny crab’s next accidentally artistic pursuits.”

Source: http://tinyurl.com/7vpzwj8
Video of the Sand bubbler crab in action:http://vimeo.com/6449515

(Source: brains-and-bodies, via scinerds)

September 9, 2014 3:01 pm

cool-critters:

Hummingbird hawk moth (Macroglossum stellatarum)

The hummingbird hawk-moth is a species in the family Sphingidae. It is distributed throughout the northern Old World from Portugal to Japan, but is resident only in warmer climates (southern Europe, North Africa, and points east).

It is a strong flier, dispersing widely and can be found virtually anywhere in the hemisphere in the summer. Its long proboscis and its hovering behaviour, accompanied by an audible humming noise, make it look remarkably like a hummingbird while feeding on flowers. It flies during the day, especially in bright sunshine, but also at dusk, dawn, and even in the rain, which is unusual for even diurnal hawkmoths.

Its visual abilities have been much studied, and it has been shown to have a relatively good ability to learn colours.

photo credits: wiki, bbc, wildlifeinsight, glaucus

(via rhamphotheca)

August 26, 2014 3:25 pm

Family Saturniidae- The Giant Silkworm Moths

Saturniidae is a large family of moths with roughly 2300 known species. Adult saturniids can be easily recognized by their large, hairy bodies and relatively small heads. Adults of this group have reduced mouthparts and do not eat. They instead live off of the fat that they stored up as a larva. Because of this they are able to devote almost all of their time to reproduction. The adult males have very large, feathery antennae that allow them to detect the pheromones of a female from great distances.

(Source: Encyclopedia of Life)

(Image credit: 1, 2, 3)

August 25, 2014 8:54 pm

astronomy-to-zoology:

Zebra Conchylodes (Conchylodes ovulalis)

…a species of pytaustine crambid moth which occurs in North America from Pennsylvania to Florida west to Arizona and south into the neotropics. Adult Conchylodes ovulalis are typically seen in flight from May to September or August and inhabit deciduous and possibly other forests. Zebra conchylodes are typically associated and feed on the Asteraceae.  

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Lepidoptera-Pyraloidea-Crambidae-Pyraustinae-Spilomelini-Conchylodes-C. ovulalis

Images: ©Micheal Skvarla and ©Larry McDaniel

August 23, 2014 5:08 pm
rhamphotheca:

Baby Flamboyant Cuttlefish (Metasepia pfefferi) in egg, Negros Oriental, Philippines
“Although still inside of its egg, these flamboyant cuttlefish were still able to flash dark purple if something got too close. when they are born they will be ready to hunt and change color on their own...”
photograph/comments by Dan Geary
(via: Project Noah)

rhamphotheca:

Baby Flamboyant Cuttlefish (Metasepia pfefferi) in egg, Negros Oriental, Philippines

Although still inside of its egg, these flamboyant cuttlefish were still able to flash dark purple if something got too close. when they are born they will be ready to hunt and change color on their own...”

photograph/comments by Dan Geary

(via: Project Noah)

August 22, 2014 10:48 am
Some Moths are Actually Butterflies According to DNA Sequencing Study